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Combination breast cancer therapy targets tumor cells and the blood vessels that feed them

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Each day, normal human cell tissues express a protein known as p53 that wages war against potential malignancies. However, between 30 and 40 percent of human breast cancers express a defective (mutant) form of p53 that helps cancer cells proliferate and grow. Now, researchers at the University of...
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ScienceDaily - Combination breast cancer therapy targets tumor cells and the blood vessels that feed them

Known risk factors largely explain links between loneliness and first time heart disease / stroke

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Conventional risk factors largely explain the links observed between loneliness/social isolation and first time heart disease/stroke, finds the largest study of its kind published online in the journal Heart.

Climate policy, carbon emissions from permafrost

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Controlling greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades could substantially reduce the consequences of carbon releases from thawing permafrost during the next 300 years, according to a new article.
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ScienceDaily - Geoengineering polar glaciers to slow sea-level rise
ScienceDaily - Cutting greenhouse gas emissions would help spare cities worldwide from rising seas

1 in 3 young adults say they’ve ridden with an impaired driver

Futurity / Ziba Kashef-Yale - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
One-third of young adults aged 19 and 20 report riding in a motor vehicle with an impaired driver at the wheel at least once in the past year, a new study reports. Marijuana use, not alcohol, was more likely to be the cause of the impairment. Researchers used data from the NEXT Generation Healt...

Mutation promts lung tumor cells to morph into gut cells

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Tumors are notoriously mixed up; cells from one part often express different genes a...
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Futurity / Marla Broadfoot-Duke - Gut cells turn up in lung tumors

Who becomes a hero? It is more than just a personality trait

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We tend to think of heroes in terms of a psychological profile: brave, altruistic, strong. But a new study suggests that for at least one kind of heroism, it takes a village to save a life.

Prenatal stress changes brain connectivity in-utero

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The time babies spend in the womb is far from idle. The brain is changing more rapidly during this time than at any other time in development. It is an active time for the fetus to grow and explore, and of course connect to its mother. New evidence from in-utero fetal brain scans shows, for the f...

Looking deeper into brain function

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As neuroscience enters the era of big data bases, a new approach could offer a deeper and more systematic understanding of brain function, scientists argue.

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial cellulose

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Bacterial cellulose can be used in food, cosmetics and biomedical applications, such as implants and artificial organs.

Intricacies of the pursuit of higher self-control

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Self-control is a central human capacity associated with a wide range of personal and societal advantages. In view of its benefits, increasing self-control among children and adults has been advocated as a remedy to many of society's ailments, from childhood obesity to adulthood criminal behavior...

Improve your information security by giving employees more options

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove A recent study suggests information security managers and supervisors could have gre...

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing deep in the brain

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Researchers have developed an endoscope as thin as a human hair that can image the activity of neurons in the brains of living mice, giving researchers access to areas that cannot be seen with microscopes or other types of endoscopes.

Opioid analgesics reduce use of antipsychotics in persons with Alzheimer's disease

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Initiating an opioid analgesic reduced the use of antipsychotics and benzodiazepines in persons with Alzheimer's disease, a recent study shows. These drugs are frequently prescribed to treat behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia, which can be worsened by other symptoms, such as pain.

Chance is a factor in the survival of species

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In a major study, biologists have studied the role of chance in whether a species survives or dies out locally. One possible consequence according to the researchers, is that although conservation initiatives can save endangered species, sometimes chance can override such efforts.

Gulf of Mexico dead zone not expected to shrink anytime soon

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Achieving water quality goals for the Gulf of Mexico may take decades, according to ...

New method speeds up development of medication

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Researchers have developed a novel method that speeds up the process of determining crystal structures of organic salts and significantly reduces the effort required to do so. As about 40 percent of all active pharmaceutical ingredients are salts, this new crystallographic method is set to greatl...

Blood lead levels of Flint children before and after water crisis

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Flint children's blood lead levels were nearly three times higher almost a decade before the year of the Flint water crisis, new research shows.

Four types of employees who are potential insider threats

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Academics have identified four types of employees who can become a threat to their companies – and explained the reasons why their workplace behavior declines.

Investigating the enigmatic link between periodontal inflammation and retinal degeneration

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Many clinical studies link Chronic Periodontitis (CP) to various systemic disorders and lately age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of irreversible vision loss in elderly, is found to be associated with periodontal disease. The keystone oral-pathobiont and one of the major caus...

Study finds hospital quality report cards and readmission penalties may not tell whole story

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Over the past several years, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have...

Hoverboard injuries speeding U.S. kids to the ER

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(HealthDay)—Hoverboards may look cool, flashy and fun, but they're less safe than you might think.

Study suggests uncertainty in e-cigarettes' usefulness for quitting smoking

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An analysis of data from a previous study of more than 1,350 smokers intending to quit after a hospitalization found that those who reported using electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) during the study period were less likely to have successfully quit smoking 6 months after entering the study. The...

Vulnerability and extinction risk of migratory species from different regions and ecosystems worldwide

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Forty million miles of major roads crisscross the Earth's continents -- enough to ci...

Biologists discover that female purple sea urchins prime their progeny to succeed in the face of stress

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This story begins in the kelp forest and ends with a very important climate change message: All is not lost -- at least not for purple sea urchins.

Better Diet Data Via Tooth-Mounted Sensors

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove In First World countries, where famine is unheard of, people are instead eating them...
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The Riddle of Twin Telepathy

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Claims that some twins share a telepathic bond are anecdotal at best.

Vaginal Birth vs. C-Section: Pros & Cons

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A woman can deliver her baby either by vaginal birth or a C-section. Both delivery methods have advantages and disadvantages.

Food waste: The biggest loss could be what you choose to put in your mouth

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Researchers have now found a novel way to define and quantify a second type of wastage. The scientists have called it 'opportunity food loss,' a term inspired by the 'opportunity cost' concept in economics, which refers to the cost of choosing a particular alternative over better options.

Prenatal choline intake increases grey and white matter in piglets

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Choline intake during pregnancy can influence infant metabolism and brain development, according to a series of studies from the University of Illinois. Although the role of choline in neurodevelopment has been studied before in rodents, the new research, done with pigs, has more relevance to hum...

New targeted therapy schedule could keep melanoma at bay

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Skin melanoma, a particularly insidious cancer, accounts for the vast majority skin cancer deaths and is one of the most common cancers in people under 30. Treatment for advanced melanoma has seen success with targeted therapies - drugs that interfere with division and growth of cancer cells by t...

Atomically thin light-emitting device opens the possibility for 'invisible' displays

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Engineers have built a bright-light emitting device that is millimeters wide and ful...

Mystery solved: 6-inch skeleton isn’t an alien after all

Futurity / Stanford - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
New research stamps out any remaining questions about a tiny, mysterious skeleton’s home planet—it’s without a doubt human. And, more than that, the analysis answers questions about remains that have long been a genetic enigma. After five years of deep genomic analysis, Garry Nolan, profes...
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BBC - Origin of 'six-inch mummy' confirmed
Medical Xpress - Once-mysterious 'Atacama Skeleton' illuminates genetics of bone disease

A CRISPR/Cas9 mutation prevention system could help prevent and fight disease in the future

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Researchers developed an in vivo mutation prevention method that enables the DNA-cleaving Cas9 enzyme to discriminate between genomic target sites differing by a single nucleotide and to exclusively cut the unwanted one. In proof-of-concept studies performed in bacterial E. coli strains grown in ...

Cell tower radiation confirmed to cause cancer in animals

Naturalnews.com / Isabelle Z. - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Natural News) It’s not surprising that so many people have cancer nowadays. Carcinogens are in the water we drink, the food we eat and the air we breathe. We might be able to control what we choose to eat and drink, but the invisible dangers you’re exposed to in your daily life are another s...

When tickling the brain to stimulate memory, location matters

Science News / Rachel Ehrenberg - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Conflicting results regarding the benefits of brain stimulation may be explained by the precise location of electrodes.

'Financial health' is good medicine in mental health care

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Spend an afternoon doing mental health research with Annie Harper, Ph.D. and you might find yourself checking out the prices at a local rent-to-own store, helping a client pull his credit report, or listening as Harper speaks on the phone, convincing a student loan collection agency to restructur...

Microglia pruning brain synapses captured on film for the first time

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For the first time, EMBL researchers have captured microglia pruning synaptic connections between brain cells. Their findings show that the special glial cells help synapses grow and rearrange, demonstrating the essential role of microglia in brain development. Nature Communications will publish ...
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ScienceDaily - Captured on film for the first time: Microglia nibbling on brain synapses

Children with autism and their younger siblings less likely to be fully vaccinated

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Children with autism and their younger siblings are significantly less likely to be ...

Younger aged children with symptoms of ADHD have reduced brain size

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Children as young as four years old with symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) showed reduced brain volumes in regions essential for behavioral control, according to a new study. The research represents the first comprehensive examination of cortical brain volume in preschoo...

Cancer patients' pain eased by simple bedside chart

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Patients with cancer could benefit from a simple bedside system to manage their pain, a study suggests.
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Medical Xpress - Cancer patients' pain eased by simple bedside chart, study shows

Why are whales so big?

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Examining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes -- big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can't find enough food.

Blowin' in the wind -- A source of energy?

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It may in the future be possible to harvest energy with the aid of leaves fluttering in the wind. Researchers have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa.

Study challenges previous findings that antidepressants affect breastfeeding

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New research does not support the previously observed negative impacts of antidepressant use on breastfeeding.

New targeted therapy schedule could keep melanoma at bay

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Optimizing the timing of targeted therapies for melanoma reverses tumor growth, and resistance can be mitigated.

How to make a good impression when saying hello

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You can hear the perfect hello. And now you can see it too. Researchers have established an experimental method that unveils the filter (mental representation) we use to judge people when hearing them. What is the ideal intonation for coming across as determined or trustworthy? This method is alr...

Obesity is shifting cancer to young adults

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A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has compiled evidence from more than 100 publications to show how obesity increases risk of 13 different cancers in young adults. The meta-analysis describes how obesity has shifted certain cancers to younger age groups, and intensif...

Scientists launch global effort to model pancreatic beta cell, solve diabetes

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USC researchers have launched a massive scientific effort to construct a detailed, virtual 3-D model of the pancreatic beta cell and its components—a global project that aims to one day curb the worldwide rise of diabetes.

The rhythm of genes: How the circadian clock regulates 3-D chromatin structure

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Biologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development.

'Phubbing' can threaten our basic human needs, research shows

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove New research has shown that ignoring someone you're with in a social setting to conc...

First IVF bison calf joins wild herd

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Eight bison -- four calves and their mothers -- were released in mid-March on public lands in northern Colorado. A 10-month-old calf known as IVF 1 was among the newcomers.

Modern chimp brains share similarities with ancient hominids

Science News / Bruce Bower - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
MRIs suggest certain brain folding patterns don’t mark ancient humanlike neural advances after all, raising questions about hominid brain evolution.

Music lessons improve children's cognitive skills and academic performance

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The first large-scale, longitudinal study adapted into the regular school curriculum finds that structured music lessons significantly enhance children's cognitive abilities -- including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, planning and inhibition -- leading to improved academic performan...

Vampire bat immunity and infection risk respond to livestock rearing

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The availability of livestock as a food source for vampire bats influences their immune response and infection by bacterial pathogens, according to a new article. Because cattle ranching is common in areas where the bats live, the findings have implications for human as well as animal health.

Can exercising the mind improve our abilities, or is it just another self-improvement fantasy?

Popular Science / Andrew Zaleski - - Reading time 14 mins - Share :
Science Scientists still aren’t sure why brain training only works for some people. Scientists still aren’t sure why brain training only works for some people.

In D.C., Mothers Are Dying From Pregnancy at Twice the National Rate

The Atlantic / Sophia Myszkowski - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Maternity Desert, a new documentary from The Atlantic, follows Amber Pierre, a 24-year-old African-American woman living in southeast D.C. Pierre is pregnant with her second child. After two previous miscarriages, she is navigating a high-risk pregnancy that, combined with her Medicaid coverage, ...

MS stem cell treatment stabilises disease and reduced disability, trial shows

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Pioneering international research has found stem cell treatment in people with active multiple sclerosis stabilises the disease and improves disability.

New MRI scanner could revolutionize diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors

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When Reem Itani learned she had a brain tumor, she was distraught—but not for the obvious reason. Her endocrinologist told her the tumor was "MRI-negative," meaning it didn't appear on a brain scan, a concept unfamiliar to Itani even after years in medical school and residency.

DNA methylation plays key role in stem cell differentiation

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered how the process of DNA methylation ...

World-first study links birth interventions and long-term childhood illness

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A team of leading international researchers have found significant links between medical interventions used in the birthing process – such as caesarean section and induction – and a child's long-term health.

Neural fingerprints of altruism

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Ads from Inoreader • Remove For at least 150 years, we know that traumatic brain injury can change several domai...

Important development could reduce numbers of fish required in toxicology research

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Scientists have developed a new method which could help assess the effects of chemicals on digestive systems.